tees

Showing all 7 results

  • 86 Celebration Tee

    $35.00

    The 86 Celebration tee is to commemorate the legendary lineage of the Toyota 86. Now in its current form, the GT86, proves that power is not everything and the thrill of driving can be had from its sublime handling.

    The 86 Celebration tee is made from super smooth and comfortable cotton touch polyester jersey that won’t fade after washing. All tees are quality printed, cut, and hand-sewn.

  • Godzilla Calsonic Legend Tee

    $35.00

    The Godzilla Calsonic Legend tee is an homage to the Group A Nismo Calsonic BNR32. Made from super smooth and comfortable cotton touch polyester jersey ensures that the print shouldn’t fade after washing. All tees are quality printed, cut, and hand-sewn.

    Calsonic BNR32 GT-R

    One of Nissan’s main intents when building the R32 GT-R was to win Group A races. Group A race cars were normally based on production cars with at least 5000 units produced over a 12-month period, but regulations included a supplementary clause that allowed for an “upgraded” model, as long as at least 500 of the road-going versions were produced during the year.

    Enter the Nismo GT-R. In 1990, Nissan marketed 500 limited edition GT-Rs under the Nismo banner. Nismo was Nissan’s motorsports and aftermarket division. The biggest difference between the stock GT-R and the Nismo was that the latter had a metallic turbocharger instead of a ceramic one. Nissan developed the car as a Group A racer, entrusting it to drivers Masahiro Hasemi and Kazuyoshi Hoshino.

    The R32 GT-R performed impressively on the track as expected, beating its main rival, the Ford Sierra RS500 Cosworth. The 542 HP generated by the twin-turbocharged inline-6 was distributed to all four wheels that accounted for excellent grip on all types of road surfaces. Hoshino in the blue Calsonic GT-R thrilled fans with his intense racing style of catching air over the corner curbs. From the first race of 1990 to the last of 1993, the R32 GT-R won all of its 29 Japan Touring Car Championship races, with the Calsonic Skyline claiming 15 of those victories

  • Godzilla Wnfld Legend Tee

    $35.00

    The Godzilla Wnfld Legend tee is an homage to the Group A Gibson Motorsports/Winfield BNR32 that gave the GT-R it’s moniker Godzilla. Made from super smooth and comfortable cotton touch polyester jersey ensures that the print shouldn’t fade after washing. All tees are quality printed, cut, and hand-sewn.

    This Group A Gibson Motorsports/Winfield BNR32 is the one that made a huge impact on Australian touring car racing back in the early 1990s. Piloted by Mark Skaife and Jim Richards, it annihilated the Ford and Holden V8s of the day with its 600hp all-wheel drive running gear.

    It is one of the most iconic racing cars in Australian motorsport history. It simply left its competition for dead out on the track, and even won the famous Bathurst 1000 race in 1992. It also caused drastic changes to the Australian touring car regulations, which lead to the introduction of the V8 Supercars series.

  • Million Dollar Widowmaker (Guards Red)

    $35.00

    The unisex guards red Million Dollar Widowmaker tee is a homage to the Porsche 911 GT2 Evo which is one of the rarest and hairy Porsches around.

    Porsche built just 11 examples of the 993-series 911 GT2 Evo homologation special in the mid-1990s, and in the recent years, one of the cars has been sold at auction for an impressive $1.45 million.

    In the early ‘90s, Porsche was racing in various GT2 competitions using its 993-series 911 GT2 race car. However, the automaker was in need of something more extreme to race in GT1 events. Thus, the 911 GT2 Evo was born.

    The lightweight RS set the basic template with wheel-arch flares, larger brake discs clamped by 4-piston calipers and adjustable front and rear anti-roll bars. The GT2 Evo combined the RS/RSR’s purity of purpose with a tuned version of the 993 Turbo’s 3.6-litre twin-turbocharged engine rated at a peak 600 horsepower and 490 pound-feet of torque designed to compete in the FIA GT1 category.

    Essentially a street legal race car, the GT2 Evo sported an aggressive-looking front spoiler with upturned side winglets, wider bolt-on wheel flares and a huge rear spoiler with integrated air scoops. Using 2-wheel drive instead of the production Turbo’s all-wheel system shaved even more weight, resulting in a top speed of almost 190 MPH and road-holding that bordered on the supernatural. Porsche widened the rear fender extensions to cover wider modular wheels and added a new front spoiler with inlets for oil and brake cooling. A second deck appeared on the already outlandish rear spoiler, which could be mounted higher in the air stream for added downforce. Alas, by then the competition in GT1 had already left the Evo behind. Only 11 were ever built before Porsche moved onto the 996, making these cars among the rarest in the 911 racing lineage.

  • Million Dollar Widowmaker (Lava Orange)

    $35.00

    The unisex lava orange Million Dollar Widowmaker tee is a homage to the Porsche 911 GT2 Evo which is one of the rarest and hairy Porsches around.

    Porsche built just 11 examples of the 993-series 911 GT2 Evo homologation special in the mid-1990s, and in the recent years, one of the cars has been sold at auction for an impressive $1.45 million.

    In the early ‘90s, Porsche was racing in various GT2 competitions using its 993-series 911 GT2 race car. However, the automaker was in need of something more extreme to race in GT1 events. Thus, the 911 GT2 Evo was born.

    The lightweight RS set the basic template with wheel-arch flares, larger brake discs clamped by 4-piston calipers and adjustable front and rear anti-roll bars. The GT2 Evo combined the RS/RSR’s purity of purpose with a tuned version of the 993 Turbo’s 3.6-litre twin-turbocharged engine rated at a peak 600 horsepower and 490 pound-feet of torque designed to compete in the FIA GT1 category.

    Essentially a street legal race car, the GT2 Evo sported an aggressive-looking front spoiler with upturned side winglets, wider bolt-on wheel flares and a huge rear spoiler with integrated air scoops. Using 2-wheel drive instead of the production Turbo’s all-wheel system shaved even more weight, resulting in a top speed of almost 190 MPH and road-holding that bordered on the supernatural. Porsche widened the rear fender extensions to cover wider modular wheels and added a new front spoiler with inlets for oil and brake cooling. A second deck appeared on the already outlandish rear spoiler, which could be mounted higher in the air stream for added downforce. Alas, by then the competition in GT1 had already left the Evo behind. Only 11 were ever built before Porsche moved onto the 996, making these cars among the rarest in the 911 racing lineage.

  • Million Dollar Widowmaker (Racing Yellow)

    $35.00

    The unisex racing yellow Million Dollar Widowmaker tee is a homage to the Porsche 911 GT2 Evo which is one of the rarest and hairy Porsches around.

    Porsche built just 11 examples of the 993-series 911 GT2 Evo homologation special in the mid-1990s, and in the recent years, one of the cars has been sold at auction for an impressive $1.45 million.

    In the early ‘90s, Porsche was racing in various GT2 competitions using its 993-series 911 GT2 race car. However, the automaker was in need of something more extreme to race in GT1 events. Thus, the 911 GT2 Evo was born.

    The lightweight RS set the basic template with wheel-arch flares, larger brake discs clamped by 4-piston calipers and adjustable front and rear anti-roll bars. The GT2 Evo combined the RS/RSR’s purity of purpose with a tuned version of the 993 Turbo’s 3.6-litre twin-turbocharged engine rated at a peak 600 horsepower and 490 pound-feet of torque designed to compete in the FIA GT1 category.

    Essentially a street legal race car, the GT2 Evo sported an aggressive-looking front spoiler with upturned side winglets, wider bolt-on wheel flares and a huge rear spoiler with integrated air scoops. Using 2-wheel drive instead of the production Turbo’s all-wheel system shaved even more weight, resulting in a top speed of almost 190 MPH and road-holding that bordered on the supernatural. Porsche widened the rear fender extensions to cover wider modular wheels and added a new front spoiler with inlets for oil and brake cooling. A second deck appeared on the already outlandish rear spoiler, which could be mounted higher in the air stream for added downforce. Alas, by then the competition in GT1 had already left the Evo behind. Only 11 were ever built before Porsche moved onto the 996, making these cars among the rarest in the 911 racing lineage.

  • Million Dollar Widowmaker (Sapphire Blue)

    $35.00

    The unisex sapphire blue Million Dollar Widowmaker tee is a homage to the Porsche 911 GT2 Evo which is one of the rarest and hairy Porsches around.

    Porsche built just 11 examples of the 993-series 911 GT2 Evo homologation special in the mid-1990s, and in the recent years, one of the cars has been sold at auction for an impressive $1.45 million.

    In the early ‘90s, Porsche was racing in various GT2 competitions using its 993-series 911 GT2 race car. However, the automaker was in need of something more extreme to race in GT1 events. Thus, the 911 GT2 Evo was born.

    The lightweight RS set the basic template with wheel-arch flares, larger brake discs clamped by 4-piston calipers and adjustable front and rear anti-roll bars. The GT2 Evo combined the RS/RSR’s purity of purpose with a tuned version of the 993 Turbo’s 3.6-litre twin-turbocharged engine rated at a peak 600 horsepower and 490 pound-feet of torque designed to compete in the FIA GT1 category.

    Essentially a street legal race car, the GT2 Evo sported an aggressive-looking front spoiler with upturned side winglets, wider bolt-on wheel flares and a huge rear spoiler with integrated air scoops. Using 2-wheel drive instead of the production Turbo’s all-wheel system shaved even more weight, resulting in a top speed of almost 190 MPH and road-holding that bordered on the supernatural. Porsche widened the rear fender extensions to cover wider modular wheels and added a new front spoiler with inlets for oil and brake cooling. A second deck appeared on the already outlandish rear spoiler, which could be mounted higher in the air stream for added downforce. Alas, by then the competition in GT1 had already left the Evo behind. Only 11 were ever built before Porsche moved onto the 996, making these cars among the rarest in the 911 racing lineage.

Showing all 7 results